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Christopher Bowman- Death Ruled Drug Overdose

Former two-time U.S. champion Christopher Bowman died from a drug overdose and an enlarged heart. The cause of death was ruled accidental.

The L.A. chief coroner investigator’s report was released Feb. 8 with its ruling. Bowman, 40, was found dead inside a Los Angeles motel room on Jan. 10.

Toxicology tests found cocaine, Valium and marijuana as well as the prescription medicine Seroquel (used to treat bipolar disorder) in his system at the time of death. His blood-alcohol level was 0.12 percent.

At death, the 6-foot-1 Bowman weighed 261 pounds.

Published reports indicate Bowman was on probation at the time of his death. He was arrested Nov. 23 on a misdemeanor charge of receiving and concealing stolen property. He pleaded no contest and was sentenced Dec. 14 to seven days in county jail, two years' probation and community service.

Bowman was born in Hollywood, Calif., on March 30, 1967. He was a child actor whose credits included several episodes of the TV series “Little House on the Prairie.” Bowman had recently returned to Southern California to attempt a comeback in acting.

Dubbed “Bowman the Showman,” he was a talented skater who won two U.S. titles (1989 and 1992), two silver medals (in 1987 and 1991) and a bronze (1988). Bowman won the silver medal at the 1989 World Championships, and a bronze medal in 1990. He was a two-time Olympian, finishing fourth at 1992 Games and seventh at the 1988 Winter Olympics.

Bowman had battled drug addiction while skating on the eligible circuit. He had a self-admitted cocaine habit during his eligible career and that he had checked into the Betty Ford Center before the 1988 Olympic Games.

Bowman retired from competitive skating after the 1992 World Championships, and toured with Ice Capades for one year. He then turned to coaching, working first in Massachusetts and then in Detroit. He lived in Michigan from 1995 until 2007.

He was divorced from Annette Bowman, with whom he had a daughter, who is now 10.


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